Yukitsuri: The Strange Structures That Have Been Saving Japan’s Tree Branches for Hundreds of Years (PHOTOS)

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Yukitsuri: The Strange Structures That Have Been Saving Japan’s Tree Branches for Hundreds of Years (PHOTOS)‘The Weather Channel

In a marriage of beauty and function, Japan’s gardens can be seen sprouting crown-like structures every autumn until the springtime. They’re called yukitsuri, and they protect tree branches from snapping under the weight of heavy snowfall.’

Yukitsuri means “snow suspenders” in Japanese. According to The Japan Times, the earliest recorded usage of Yukitsiri is from the Edo Period between 1603 and 1867. They are most commonly seen in areas of heavy snowfall, such as Toyama, Ishikawa and Fukui prefectures along the coast of the Sea of Japan.

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What Can Human Mothers (and Everyone Else) Learn from Animal Moms?

Mother's Day celebrates the accomplishments of human mothers, but how do moms across the animal kingdom cope with the demands of pregnancy, birth and child rearing?
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  • Publisher: Live Science
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  • Publisher: Business Insider
  • Author: Carrie Wittmer
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