Where There’s Thunder, There’s Lightning Science

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Lightning during a heavy rainstorm is one of the most dramatic phenomena on the planet’and it happens, somewhere on Earth, an estimated 50 to 100 times a second. Is it true that where there's lightning, there's thunder ... answers.yahoo.com /question/index?qid=20060801194558AA1wasb Where there's lightning , there's thunder (assuming you have an atmosphere). Thunder is the sound of the electrical discharge making its way to ground. But where there's thunder there doesn't have to be rain. Dry electrical storms do happen. But even though scientists have been puzzling over the physics of lightning for decades, stretching back even to Ben Franklin’s kite experiment, much of the science remains mysterious.

For example, while we can generate and study small lightning in the lab, there’s no match for the much larger bolts of the real thing’but researchers still can’t predict exactly where lightning strikes, or even what exactly generates the high-voltage arc in a thundercloud.

Publisher: Science Friday
Reference: Visit Source

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Derek Kevra with the science of time between seeing lightning and hearing thunder

Do you remember as a little kid that the time beween a flash of lightning and hearing the thunder, is about five seconds for every mile.

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It all comes down to the speed of sound versus the speed of light. Where There is Thunder, There is Lightning cocorahs.blogspot.com/2015/06/ where-there-is-thunder-there -is.html Where There is Thunder, There is Lightning This week is Lightning Safety Awareness week in many parts of the country . If your local National Weather Service office is participating then you may have seen their links to some lightning information on their web page. Also a factor, is the temperature – the warmer it is, the faster the speed of thunder.

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Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib learned Thursday she is banned from entering Israel with her colleagues on a trip scheduled to start this weekend.’

The trip was also personal. Where There’s Thunder, There’s Lightning Science www.sciencefriday.com/segments/ where-theres-thunder-theres-lightning -science For example, while we can generate and study small lightning in the lab, there’s no match for the much larger bolts of the real thing—but researchers still can’t predict exactly where lightning strikes, or even what exactly generates the high-voltage arc in a thundercloud. Tlaib’s grandmother lives in the West Bank and she had plans to go see her.’

Publisher: WJBK
Author: FOX
Twitter: @WJBK
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Watch Lightning Strikes Streak Across Oregon with This Time

A wave of weekend thunderstorms brought Portland its second-wettest day of the year Saturday. And where there’s thunder, there’s lightning.

As anybody sitting on a patio Friday night could attest, this weekend’s bands of storms were electric. Videos for Where There ' s Thunder , There ' s Lightning 1:32 Why is There Thunder After Lightning ? YouTube But the lightning strikes mostly stayed east of Portland. The highest concentration of lightning was in the Cascades and their foothills, says Matthew Cullen, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service’s Portland office.

Publisher: Willamette Week
Reference: Visit Source

Why Lightning Strikes in an Arctic Gone Bizarro

Weirder still, on top of there typically being not enough heat to form deep convective clouds in the Arctic, there’s also a limit to how high these things can build up into the atmosphere. Real Time Lightning Map :: LightningMaps.org www. lightning maps.org/realtime See lightning strikes in real time across the planet. Free access to maps of former thunderstorms. By Blitzortung.org and contributors. Around the equator, the tropopause’a sort of boundary between the troposphere and the stratosphere’sits on average about 10 miles up, while near the poles it’s on average half that high. ‘It’s this stable layer in the atmosphere that acts essentially as a lid on these convective clouds,’ says UCLA climate scientist Daniel Swain. One of these convective clouds needs to rise at minimum 15,000 feet if it’s going to produce a thunderstorm, and the tropopause makes that harder to do in the Arctic than at the equator.

Publisher: Wired
Author: Cond’ Nast
Twitter: @wired
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Greetings Earthlings: We are out of our element The data presented above may one day be zapped to another dimension. Just thought you should be aware. Hey, buddy, why are all the planets not aligning?