What ‘The Meg’ gets wrong ‘ and right ‘ about megalodon sharks

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What ‘The Meg’ gets wrong ‘ and right ‘ about megalodon sharks‘Science NewsScience of ‘The Meg’: How Scientists Know the World’s Largest Shark Is Gone Forever‘Live ScienceThe Meg: the myth, the legend (the science)‘BBC News

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SHARK STUDY’ A megalodon shark swims past a polycarbonate ‘cage’ containing a biological oceanographer, played by Li Bingbing, in The Meg.’

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OK, so what if a giant prehistoric shark, thought to be extinct for about 2.5 million years, is actually still lurking in the depths of the ocean? That’s the premise of the new flick The Meg, which opens August 10 and pits massive Carcharocles megalodon against a grizzled and fearless deep-sea rescue diver, played by Jason Statham, and a handful of resourceful scientists.

  • Publisher: Science News
  • Date: 2018-08-10T12:41:09-04:00
  • Author: Carolyn Gramling
  • Twitter: @ScienceNews
  • Citation: Web link

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Science of ‘The Meg’: How Scientists Know the World’s Largest Shark Is Gone Forever

Picture a shark as long as a bowling lane, with teeth bigger than your hand and a bite as powerful as a T. rex's. This toothy predator is called Megalodon. It was the biggest shark that ever lived — and perhaps fortunately for us, it went extinct almost 3 million years ago.

But in the movie "The Meg," one, solitary Megalodon is still lurking in the depths of the Pacific Ocean. It attacks a deep-sea submersible and terrorizes beachgoers, until a team of intrepid marine biologists figure out how to defeat the giant shark and save the day. Is that even remotely possible?

  • Publisher: Live Science
  • Twitter: @LiveScience
  • Citation: Web link

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The Meg: the myth, the legend (the science)

Proposing that the extinct Megalodon, a large prehistoric relative of the great white shark, has survived to the present day, the film follows its subsequent encounter with humanity.

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Shark researcher and Megalodon expert Catalina Pimiento from Swansea University wants to break down a few myths.

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Researchers have pinned the date of Megalodon’s extinction at about 2.6 million years ago – roughly when its cousin the great white shark was just becoming established.

In The Meg, Megalodon has survived the ages in a previously unknown (to humans) area of deep ocean off the coast of China.

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The Meg: real Megalodon shark would eat Jason Statham for breakfast

This week you can go to the cinema and see Jason Statham take on a giant prehistoric shark. The Meg sees the action star face off against a Megalodon, a long-extinct shark far larger than today’s great whites.

The film looks gloriously silly and is expected to do well at the box office, partly because it seems to have embraced the inherent daftness of its premise. Unlike Jaws, which featured a living species of shark ‘ albeit with an uncharacteristic taste for human flesh, rather than seal ‘ The Meg is the Jurassic World of shark movies.

  • Publisher: New Scientist
  • Twitter: @newscientist
  • Citation: Web link

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Check out these shark films to prepare for ‘The Meg’

Ellen Fike is the Wyoming Tribune Eagle’s features reporter. She can be reached at [email protected] or 307-633-3135. Follow her on Twitter @EllenLFike

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  • Publisher: Wyoming Tribune Eagle
  • Author: Ellen Fike Wyoming Tribune Eagle
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