CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — NASA is about to announce the winners of its latest Centennial Challenge to

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[ Teams Engineer Complex Human Tissues, Win Top Prizes in NASA Challenge ]


Publisher: NASA
Date: 2021-06-09T11:31-04:00
Twitter: @NASA
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NASA to name winners of human tissue growth challenge today. Here’s how to watch online.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. ‘ NASA is about to announce the winners of its latest Centennial Challenge to grow human tissue in a lab, and you can watch the action live online.’

You can watch the announcement live here and on the Space.com homepage, courtesy of NASA, or you can watch it directly from the agency here.

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NASA’s Centennial Challenge program launched in 2005 to “generate revolutionary solutions to problems of interest to NASA and the nation,” according to the agency. Other challenges have focused on 3D printed habitats, space robotics, and converting carbon dioxide into sugars.

Publisher: www.space.com
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Wake Forest teams win a NASA prize for 3D printing human liver tissue

The teams, respectively dubbed Winston and WFIRM, each managed to produce a centimeter-square hunk-o-meat capable of surviving and nominally operating for a span of 30 days, albeit using divergent methodologies. Yeah, granted, even NASA admits that both teams relied on similar “3D printing technologies to create gel-like molds, or scaffolds, with a network of channels designed to maintain sufficient oxygen and nutrient levels to keep the constructed tissues alive,” they differed on their printing designs and materials.’

‘I cannot overstate what an impressive accomplishment this is. When NASA started this challenge in 2016, we weren’t sure there would be a winner,’ Jim Reuter, NASA associate administrator for space technology, said in a recent press statement. ‘It will be exceptional to hear about the first artificial organ transplant one day and think this novel NASA challenge might have played a small role in making it happen.’

Publisher: finance.yahoo.com
Twitter: @Yahoo
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Wake Forest research team wins NASA challenge to develop lab-grown human vascular tissue

WINSTON-SALEM ‘A team of researchers from Wake Forest University led by Kelsey Willson, a graduate student, has won NASA’s Vascular Tissue Challenge, and will receive $300,000 and the opportunity to test their technology on the International Space Station.

‘Not only was this a scientifically difficult challenge,’ said Willson, there were technical hurdles due to the onset of the global coronavirus pandemic.’ She and her team were locked out of their lab for a period of time, due to COVID-19, said Willson.

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Publisher: WRAL TechWire
Date: 2021-06-09T19:48:53Z
Twitter: @WRALTechWire
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Wake Forest engineers win NASA’s Vascular Tissue Challenge

June 9 (UPI) — A pair of engineering teams from Wake Forest University took home first and second place in NASA’s Vascular Tissue Challenge, the space agency announced Wednesday.

Both teams used slightly different techniques to 3D-print vascularized liver tissue in the lab. Now, the two engineering teams will get the opportunity to test their breakthrough tissue models on the International Space Station. Advertisement

For the challenge, NASA called on research teams to develop tissue models that were vascularized — meaning that it had blood vessels — was functional and could survive for at least a month.

Publisher: UPI
Date: 2021-06-09T18:04:16-04:00
Author: Brooks Hays
Twitter: @UPI
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Teams Engineer Complex Human Tissues, Win Top Prizes in NASA Challenge

The research may help enable the growth and long-term survival of thick three-dimensional tissues for research and therapeutic applications, and eventually organ bandages and replacements. In the near term, they could accelerate pharmaceutical testing and disease modeling. And while more advancements are needed to make it a reality, artificial organs developed from a patient’s own cells would change lives, reduce transplant waitlists, and help end the organ shortage.

The winning teams used 3D printing technologies to create gel-like molds, or scaffolds, with a network of channels designed to maintain sufficient oxygen and nutrient levels to keep the constructed tissues alive for their 30-day trials, as specified in the challenge rules. Winston and WFIRM used different 3D-printed designs and different materials to produce live tissues that harbored cell types found in human livers.


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Author: finanzen net GmbH
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Greetings Earthlings: There was a bright light and zap. The data presented above may one day be zapped to another dimension. Just thought you should be aware. It should be alright to step abroad. It is safe.