SpaceX set to launch NASA’s awesome black hole explorer’and soon

This entry was posted in Interesting Phenomena on by .

Many things are taking place:

Black Hole Image Makes History After EHT Telescope Captures Shadow: NASA |

Using the Event Horizon Telescope, scientists obtained an image of the black hole at the center of galaxy M87, outlined by emission from hot gas swirling around it under the influence of strong gravity near its event horizon. (NASA Image)

(NASA) ‘ A black hole and its shadow have been captured in an image for the first time, a historic feat by an international network of radio telescopes called the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT).

EHT is an international collaboration whose support in the U.S. includes the National Science Foundation.

A black hole is an extremely dense object from which no light can escape. Anything that comes within a black hole’s ‘event horizon,’ its point of no return, will be consumed, never to re-emerge, because of the black hole’s unimaginably strong gravity.

Date: D55BEF2DD2548FC379360332C581B42D
Reference: Visit Source

The Most Outstanding Science News and Breakthroughs from 2018

2018 as a whole was equal parts weird, wonderful, and worrying. The same can be said of the science that happened this year. From a sun-bound space probe to controversial designer babies made by a rogue scientist, this year’s science headlines read like chapter titles to a cheap sci-fi novel.

Here’s our recap ‘ in no particular order ‘ of some of the most outstanding scientific breakthroughs, news, and discoveries from the past 12 months.

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe had a bumpy beginning, as a series of budget cuts in the 2000s relegated the mission to a mere twinkle in the agency’s eye. But in August, the extraordinary probe, designed to study the sun from the very edge of its atmosphere, finally launched from the Space Launch Complex 37 at Florida’s Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

Reference: Visit Source

X-Ray Telescope Designed for Dark Energy Search Ready to Launch

A German telescope is ready to search for dark energy and other strange things in the universe, launching Saturday (June 22) aboard a Russian rocket.’

The telescope is hitching a ride with a parent satellite called Spektrum-R’ntgen-Gamma (Spektr-RG) on board a Proton rocket. Blastoff is scheduled for 8:17 a.m. EDT (1217 GMT, 5:17 p.m. local time) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. If all goes well for Russian space agency Roscosmos, Spektr-RG will spend four years surveying the entire sky and then 2.5 years zeroing in on particular cosmic objects.’The launch was postponed from Friday (June 21) due to an unnamed issue.

Reference: Visit Source

The ‘Impossible’ Tech Behind SpaceX’s New Engine

Followers of the Church of Elon will no doubt already be aware of SpaceX’s latest technical triumph: the test firing of the first full-scale Raptor engine. Of course, it was hardly a secret. As he often does, Elon has been ‘leaking’ behind the scenes information, pictures, and even video of the event on his Twitter account. Combined with the relative transparency of SpaceX to begin with, this gives us an exceptionally clear look at how literal rocket science is performed at the’Hawthorne, California based company.

The full-flow staged combustion engine is often considered the ‘Holy Grail’ of rocketry, as it promises to extract the most possible energy from its liquid propellants. In a field where every ounce is important, being able to squeeze even a few percent more thrust out of the vehicle is worth fighting for. Especially if, like SpaceX, you’re planning on putting these new full-flow engines into the world’s largest operational booster rocket’and spacecraft.

Publisher: Hackaday
Date: 2019-02-13T15:01:06+00:00
Twitter: @hackaday
Reference: Visit Source

Greetings Earthlings: There was a bright light and zap. The data presented above may one day be zapped to another dimension. Just thought you should be aware. Hey, buddy, why are all the planets not aligning?