Scientists Over the Moon for NASA’s Solar Probe Launch to the Sun

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Scientists Over the Moon for NASA’s Solar Probe Launch to the Sun‘Space.comAlabama science, tech are all over NASA’s new Parker Solar Probe‘AL.comParker Solar Probe Mission Launches to Touch the Sun‘Sidney Herald Leader
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Speechless is not a word typically used to describe Nicky Fox, mission scientist for the Parker Solar Probe at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab. But that was her reaction in the wee hours today (Aug. 12) as she watched NASA's Parker Solar Probe launch on an unprecedented mission to the sun.
"It was very emotional," Fox told Space.com. "I was speechless and I’m not normally speechless."
The predawn skies lit up like daylight as a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy lifted off at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station here, carrying the Parker Solar Probe on humanity's first mission to touch the sun

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Many things are taking place:

Alabama science, tech are all over NASA’s new Parker Solar Probe

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe launched from Florida before dawn today aboard a rocket built in Decatur, Ala., and carrying a key scientific instrument built in Huntsville.

Delayed once on Saturday, the Sunday launch at 2:31 a.m. CDT appeared flawless. A few hours later, the missions operations manager reported that the spacecraft the size of a small car was healthy and operating normally.

“This mission truly marks humanity’s first visit to a star that will have implications not just here on Earth, but how we better understand our universe,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. “We’ve accomplished something that decades ago, lived solely in the realm of science fiction.”

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Parker Solar Probe Mission Launches to Touch the Sun

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe mission launched Aug. 11 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The mission will be the first to fly directly through the Sun’s corona ‘ the hazardous region of intense heat and solar radiation in the Sun’s atmosphere that is visible during an eclipse. It will gather data that could help answer questions about solar physics that have puzzled scientists for decades. Gathering information about fundamental processes near the Sun can help improve our understanding of how our solar system’s star changes the space environment, where space weather can affect astronauts, interfere with satellite orbits, or damage spacecraft electronics.

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NASA’s Parker Solar Probe: Cape Canaveral prepares for epic mission to the Sun

Tony Taliancich, launch director for ULA, describes final preparations at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for NASA's historic mission to 'touch the sun.' The mission hopes to gain a wealth of data on our solar system's star.

CAPE CANAVERAL –  NASA plans to make history Saturday when its Parker Solar Probe blasts off on an epic mission to the Sun. Workers at Cape Canaveral are making final preparations for the launch, which will take the spacecraft on an incredible journey through the Sun’s corona.

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NASA’s Parker Solar Probe Is Named for Him. 60 Years Ago, No One Believed His Ideas About the Sun.

CHICAGO ‘ It was 1958. Sputnik had launched only a year earlier, the first human-made object to circle the planet. But the beach ball-size spacecraft had no instruments to measure anything in space.
The study of what was up there was largely limited to what scientists could observe from the ground. It certainly looked like the vast expanses between planets were empty. And that is what most scientists believed.
But not Eugene N. Parker, then a 31-year-old, no-name professor at the University of Chicago. In a foundational paper published in The Astrophysical Journal, Dr

Ongoing.

‘The prevailing view among some people was that space was absolutely clean, nothing in it, total vacuum,’ Dr. Parker recalled during an interview at his home.

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