New studies raise questions on fundamental theories about the universe

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Publisher: The Jerusalem Post | JPost.com
Date: 2019-05-01T17:30Z
Twitter: @Jerusalem_Post
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While you’re here, how about this:

A quantum leap in particle simulation

A group of scientists at the Department of Energy’s Fermilab has figured out how to use quantum computing to simulate the fundamental interactions that hold together our universe. In a paper published in Physical Review Letters, Fermilab researchers fill a conspicuous gap in modeling the subatomic world using quantum computers, addressing a family of particles that, until recently, has been relatively neglected in quantum simulations.

The fundamental particles that make up our universe can be divided into two groups: particles called fermions, which are the building blocks of matter, and particles called bosons, which are field particles and tug on the matter particles.

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Dementia: The greatest health challenge of our time

Dementia was first described by the German doctor Alois Alzheimer in 1906 after he performed an autopsy on a woman with profound memory loss.

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Memory loss is the most common feature of dementia, particularly the struggle to remember recent events.

Other symptoms can include changes to behaviour, mood and personality, becoming lost in familiar places or being unable to find the right word in a conversation.

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Others include vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, fronto-temporal dementia, Parkinson’s disease dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the newly discovered Late.

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Publisher: BBC News
Author: Author link
Twitter: @BBCNews
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The Problem With Putting a Price on the End of the World

On a Saturday afternoon in early December, inside a soaring auditorium on the campus of Stockholm University, William Nordhaus gave the crowning lecture of his half-century career as an economist. The occasion was his acceptance of the Nobel Prize in economics, which Nordhaus, a trim, soft-spoken Yale professor, had been jointly awarded. The title of the lecture was ‘Climate Change: The Ultimate Challenge for Economics.’

As a young professor on a sabbatical in Vienna in the mid-1970s, Nordhaus happened to share an office with an environmental researcher, who helped spark his interest in the emerging issue. While there, Nordhaus came up with the target, now famous, of holding global warming to two degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels. He chose the target, as he recently explained to me, because he believed that the earth has experienced similar fluctuations before and that humans had tolerated them.

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Date: 2019-04-10T02:24:59.000Z
Author: David Leonhardt
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Happening on Twitter

Greetings Earthlings: There was a bright light and zap. The data presented above may one day be zapped to another dimension. Just thought you should be aware. Alert, alert. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED.