NASA will soon fire up the most powerful rocket ever built

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NASA plans to ignite the most powerful rocket it’s ever built on Jan. 17 according to a statement from the agency.

It will be the first firing of the Space Launch System (SLS), the long-awaited (and delayed) rocket ship that NASA plans to use for non-commercial human space flight. It’s the centerpiece of NASA’s Artemis program, a crewed mission to land, in language NASA frequently uses, “the first woman and next man” on the moon.’

Publisher: www.livescience.com
Date: 2021-01-10T12:00:00Z
Author: Rafi Letzter
Reference: Visit Source (Read Article)

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Publisher: SciTechDaily
Date: 2021-01-09T22:28:30-08:00
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NASA to lift off most powerful Space Launch System (SLS) rocket on January 17

NASA on January 9 conducted a Green Run hot fire test for its massive Space Launch System (SLS) rocket which is set to be launched’as early as Jan. 17.’In the historic’eight-part test campaign of the most powerful rocket ever built by the space administration, NASA ignited the liquid fuel engines in the core stage’of the’Space Launch System (SLS) without the solid fuel boosters ignition. The rocket will power the next-generation human Moon missions of NASA’s Artemis program.

In an official statement, NASA said that SLS will transport weight that can go up to 27 tons (24,000 kilograms) to the moon, which is slightly less than Saturn V. The 322 feet tall (98 meters) rocket is 363-foot (110 m) Saturn V rockets that transported humans to the moon but the space agency will refurbish the core stage and dispatch the ship SLS to the agency’s Pegasus barge’of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

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Publisher: Republic World
Date: 46255256F7B435C502CFADCCBD97D1C9
Author: Republic World
Twitter: @republic
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How will the U.S. space program fare under Joe Biden?

Joe Biden is the United States presidential election winner, but his plans for NASA remain unclear. And while citizens digest the election results, the space industry is left wondering what comes next.

President-elect of the United States Joe Biden speaking with supporters at a community event at Sun City MacDonald Ranch in Henderson, Nevada. Image via Planetary Society/ Gage Skidmore.

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Publisher: EarthSky
Date: 2021-01-10T07:00:48-06:00
Author: Lia Rovira
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NASA will soon fire up the most powerful rocket ever built

However, during this first ignition, only the liquid fuel engines at the core of the rocket will be tested, without the solid fuel boosters that will one day help carry SLS into orbit.

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At 322 feet tall (98 meters), the SLS stands a head shorter than the 363-foot (110 m) Saturn V rockets that carried astronauts to the moon in the 1960s and ’70s. But this rocket is substantially more powerful, producing 15% more thrust during liftoff and ascent.’

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When complete, if everything goes right, the SLS will have the capacity to carry more than 27 tons (24,000 kilograms) to the moon ‘ much more than the 24 tons (22,000 kg) the Space Shuttle hauled into low-Earth orbit, though technically less than the Saturn V carried to the moon. (However, according to Live Science sister site Space.com, less of the SLS carrying capacity will be wasted on the different rocket stages and fuel, making the SLS an overall better cargo mover.)

Publisher: www.msn.com
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