NASA traced a meteorite back to its original home in deep space

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A rare meteorite showered hundreds of fragments over Turkey in 2015 ‘ and we may now know the exact location in the solar system it came from.

Peter Jenniskens at NASA’s Ames Research Center and colleagues have traced the meteorite to a crater on the asteroid Vesta, one of the largest objects in the asteroid belt.

They believe the meteorite ‘ an estimated one-metre in diameter ‘ arose from an impact to Vesta approximately 22 million years ago, launching debris into space and ‘

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Upcoming CubeSats Put Bigger Science In Small Packages

A man peeks at a model of the CubeSat MarCO which trails the InSight lander on its mission to Mars at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Monday, Nov. 26, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif. A NASA spacecraft is just a few hours away from landing on Mars. The InSight lander is aiming for a Monday afternoon touchdown on what scientists and engineers hope will be a flat plain on the red planet. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

The first CubeSats were designed in 1999 as accessible student projects with roughly the capabilities of Sputnik, which broadcast a simple radio signal for three weeks as it orbited Earth. But 20 years later, CubeSats are doing a lot more, from Earth science to astrophysics, and they’re not solely student projects anymore; startups and university researchers are getting in on the action, although education is still an important part of the CubeSat community. NASA traced a meteorite back to its News NASA traced a meteorite back to its original home in deep space New Scientist 10 hours ago A rare meteorite showered hundreds of fragments over Turkey in 2015 – and we may now know the exact location in the solar system ... A group of upcoming projects, selected under NASA’s CubeSat launch initiative, will study distant stars, observe the most sensitive pieces of Earth’s climate system, and some will even be preparing communications technology for future missions.

  • Publisher: Forbes
  • Date: 2019-04-01
  • Author: Kiona N Smith
  • Twitter: @forbes
  • Citation: Web link (Read More)

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