NASA Saturday This Earth. The satellite will continue NASA’s three decades-long work to document rising sea levels and will

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[ NASA launch Saturday: This satellite will track Earth’s sea level rise ]

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NASA to launch satellite to track rising sea levels

NASA plans to launch a satellite tomorrow that will follow the effects of climate change on the world’s oceans and gather data to improve weather forecasts. The satellite will continue NASA’s three decades-long work to document rising sea levels and will give scientists a more precise view of the coastlines than they’ve ever had from space.

‘The best front seat view on the oceans is from space,’ says Thomas Zurbuchen, head of science at NASA.

The Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite will launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. NASA’s live coverage of the event will start at 8:45AM PT on its website, with the launch expected to take place at 9:17AM. The satellite is the first of a pair of ocean-focused satellites, which will extend NASA and the European Space Agency’s research on global sea levels for another ten years. The next satellite, the Sentinel-6B, will follow in about five years. To measure sea levels, they’ll beam electromagnetic signals down to the world’s oceans and then measure how long it takes for them to bounce back.

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Publisher: The Verge
Date: 2020-11-20T15:14:52-05:00
Author: Justine Calma
Twitter: @verge
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Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich Satellite Prepared for Launch


Publisher: NASA
Date: 2020-11-19T09:30-05:00
Twitter: @11348282
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NASA satellite to monitor sea level rise, affects of climate change

A week after it sent four astronauts to the International Space Station for the first time, SpaceX launched the first of two’satellites Saturday that will monitor sea level rise over the next decade.

NASA’s Sentinel 6-Michael Freilich oceanography satellite’ a joint venture with the European Space Agency’began a five-and-a-half-year mission to collect “the most accurate data yet’on global sea level and how our oceans are rising in response to climate change,” according to NASA.

Publisher: USA TODAY
Author: Grace Hauck
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NASA, SpaceX launch satellite to measure global sea-level rise

The first of two identical satellites that will spend at least the next decade making sea-level observations will head into Earth orbit Saturday from Vandenberg Air Force Base.

NASA is targeting 12:17 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 21, for the California launch of the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich atop SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket.

SpaceX reports the launches static fire test is complete and Falcon 9 and the satellite have been rolled out for the launch.

The satellite, named in honor of NASA’s Earth Science Divisions’ former director, follows the 2016 launch of Jason-3, the most recent U.S.-European sea level observation satellite.


Publisher: wtsp.com
Date: 11/21/2020 3:33:24 AM
Twitter: @10TampaBay
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NASA launch Saturday: This satellite will track Earth’s sea level rise

More than 830 miles above Earth’s surface, a next-generation satellite will keep an eye on global sea levels. The Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite launched Saturday.

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For 30 years, satellites have helped monitor Earth’s sea level. This satellite is the latest in that series, but it will collect the most accurate data yet on the global sea level and how it shifts in response to climate change.

Sentinel-6 has a higher resolution for collecting measurements, which means that it can track both large features, like the Gulf Stream, as well as smaller features such as coastline variations.

Publisher: www.msn.com
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