NASA International Space Station. Outer space is getting spicier, thanks to a new NASA initiative to add a little more flavor to

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[ NASA astronauts are spicing up the International Space Station ‘ by growing chile peppers on board for the first time ]

Outer space is getting spicier, thanks to a new NASA initiative to add a little more flavor to astronauts’ diets.

“The APH is the largest plant growth facility on the space station and has 180 sensors and controls for monitoring plant growth and the environment,” said project manager Nicole Dufour. “It is a diverse growth chamber, and it allows us to help control the experiment from Kennedy, reducing the time astronauts spend tending to the crops.”

The peppers will spend about four months growing before they can be harvested and eaten, marking the first time astronauts have cultivated peppers on the station from seeds to maturity. If data indicates the peppers are safe, the crew will eat some of them and send the rest back to Earth for analysis.’

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NASA astronauts are spicing up the International Space Station ‘ by growing chile peppers on board for the first time

NASA announced last week that astronauts aboard the International Space Station are growing red and green chile peppers for the very first time. Hatch chile pepper seeds arrived at the station in June, thanks to a SpaceX commercial resupply services mission.’

NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough, who launched to the ISS in April, initiated the experiment, dubbed Plant Habitat-04 (PH-04). He’s grown plants on the orbiting laboratory before, snacking on “outredgeous” red romaine lettuce in 2016.’

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Astronauts on International Space Station are growing chile peppers in a first for NASA

The astronauts are growing red and green chile peppers in space for what will be “one of the longest and most challenging plant experiments attempted aboard the orbital lab,” NASA said.

NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough, a flight engineer who helped grow “Outredgeous” red romaine lettuce in space in 2016, initiated the experiment by inserting 48 seeds into the Advanced Plant Habitat on July 12.


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Greetings Earthlings: Cloaking was activated. The data presented above may one day be zapped to another dimension. Just thought you should be aware. Dude, there was a blue light over there just now.