Master of illusion: Kokichi Sugihara’s ‘impossible’ objects

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Master of illusion: Kokichi Sugihara’s ‘impossible’ objects‘CNN

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  • Publisher: CNN Style
  • Date: 2018-05-15T09:44:25Z
  • Author: Jacopo Prisco
  • Twitter: @CNNStyle
  • Citation: Web link

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This Math Professor Creates Perplexing Optical Illusion Objects

Kokichi Sugihara is an optical illusion specialist. The maths professor and inventor both writes about and creates optical illusions that will have you stumped. 

Intermission.

His inventions have earned him first place at the Best Illusion of the Year Contest in 2010 and 2013, and second place in 2015 and 2016. Sugihara studied mathematics at the University of Tokyo.

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  • Date: 2018-05-09T16:58:00+00:00
  • Twitter: @IntEngineering
  • Citation: Web link

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25 Strange Wedding Gifts Given to Royals

With the wedding of Britain’s Prince Harry to American Meghan Markle fast approaching, heads of state from around the world will be contemplating what gifts to send to mark the occasion. Although many royal couples’including Harry and Meghan‘shy away from traditional wedding gifts and instead ask for charitable donations to be made in their names, that still doesn’t stop the barrage of often fairly bizarre and random non-registry gifts sent by well-wishers (royals’they’re just like us!). Looking back through the history books, it seems that giving unusual wedding presents to royal newlyweds is nothing new. Below are 25 strange wedding gifts given to the happy couples, dating all the way back to ancient Egypt.

  • Date: 2018-05-08T14:00:00-04:00
  • Twitter: @mental_floss
  • Citation: Web link

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Why This Optical Illusion Arrow Always Points Right

Arguably everything posted on Instagram is a distortion of reality (especially if you're a celebrity), but a video shared this week by the science account Physicsfun truly tests the laws of optics.

The video shows a simple plastic toy in the shape of an arrow, pointing right. When a hand rotates the arrow 180 degrees so that the tip should be facing left, something peculiar happens: The arrow still, somehow, appears to be pointing right. In fact, no matter how many times the arrow spins, it always points right. What's the deal?

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  • Publisher: Live Science
  • Twitter: @LiveScience
  • Citation: Web link

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