Israel’s lunar probe Beresheet crash-lands on moon’s surface

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“We definitely crashed on surface of moon,” said Opher Doron, general manager of the space division of Israel Aerospace Industries. He said the spacecraft was in pieces scattered at the planned landing site.

Beresheet is Hebrew for ‘in the beginning.’ The probe is the brainchild of three Israeli engineers running a nonprofit company SpaceIL partnered with Israel Aerospace Industries.

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If it had landed successfully, Israel would have become the fourth nation to soft land on the moon following Russia, the U.S. and China. Japan, the European Space Agency and India have all crash-landed probes on the moon.

  • Publisher: OrlandoSentinel.com
  • Author: Richard Tribou
  • Twitter: @orlandosentinel
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Israeli spacecraft Beresheet crash-lands on the moon

The SpaceIL spacecraft experienced a series of technical failures during its final descent on Thursday, shattering hopes of a historic controlled landing on the lunar surface.

It suffered periodic engine and communications failures during the 21-minute landing sequence and lost contact with Earth before scientists declared the mission a failure.

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Mr Doron explained that the spacecraft’s engine turned off shortly before landing – and by the time power was restored, the craft was moving too fast to land safely.

He added: “One of the inertial measurement units failed. Israel ' s lunar probe Beresheet News Israel’s lunar probe Beresheet crash-lands on moon's surface Orlando Sentinel 6 hours ago Israel’s lunar probe Beresheet crashed on the moon's surface Thursday after its main engine failed, the Israel Space Agency said. ... And that caused an unfortunate chain of events we’re not sure about.

Israeli Spacecraft Crash-Lands On Moon Months Before Chandrayaan

An Israeli spacecraft came within a few kilometers of the historic touchdown bid before it suffered a technical glitch and crashed on the moon surface on Thursday. A successful soft landing of the BERESHEET spacecraft would have made Israel the fourth nation in the world to soft land on the lunar surface after Russia, the US and China. India had crash-landed its Moon Impact Probe as part of Chandrayaan-1 in 2008.

Made at a cost of $100 million, the BERESHEET spacecraft was built by a private space start up SpaceIL and Israel Aerospace Industries. The spacecraft was lifted into space on board the Falcon 9 rocket on February 22, 2019 and it entered the lunar orbit on April 4, 2019. BERESHEET weighed just about 585 kilograms and it became the first privately funded satellite to orbit the moon.

  • Publisher: NDTV.com
  • Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2019 09:32:51 +0530
  • Twitter: @ndtv
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Israel’s first mission to the moon fails at the last minute, crashes into the lunar surface

Nearly two months after its launch with a SpaceX rocket, the first private mission ever to try landing on the moon has ended in failure.

The dishwasher-size robot, called Beresheet (a biblical reference that means “in the beginning”), attempted the first private moon landing on Thursday shortly after 3 p.m. EDT. The roughly 1,300-pound four-legged probe was designed and built by an Israeli nonprofit called SpaceIL and backed by about $100 million in private funding.

However, its main engine failed during its descent toward the moon. By the time mission controllers rebooted the spacecraft to try and restart the engine, according to a live broadcast of the event, it was too late.

  • Publisher: Business Insider
  • Author: Dave Mosher
  • Twitter: @SciInsider
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Israel’s Beresheet spacecraft prepares for historic moon landing

In the history of space exploration, only the U.S., Russia and China have landed a spacecraft on the moon. That could change on Thursday, when an Israeli probe now in orbit around the moon attempts to settle on the lunar surface.

The Beresheet space probe is scheduled to touch down between 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET., settling on a vast lava plain on the lunar nearside known as Mare Serenitatis, or the Sea of Serenity. The landing will be livestreamed by SpaceIL, the Israeli nonprofit organization behind the mission, and Israel Aerospace Industries, the company that built the four-legged spacecraft.

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