‘Doing Science,’ Rather than ‘Being Scientists,’ More Encouraging to Those Underrepresented in the Field

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‘Doing Science,’ Rather than ‘Being Scientists,’ More Encouraging to Those Underrepresented in the Field‘NYU News

Over the course of a school year, elementary school children lose confidence that they can ‘be scientists,’ but remain more confident that they can ‘do science.”.

Over the course of a school year, elementary school children lose confidence that they can ‘be scientists,’ but remain more confident that they can ‘do science,’ finds a new psychology study by researchers at New York University and Princeton University.

The work, which appears in the journal Developmental Science, also found that children think more adults in their community can ‘do science’ than ‘are scientists,’ suggesting that children have more inclusive views of who can do science, even while they might hold stereotypes about who can be a scientist.

‘Action-focused language’instead of identity-focused encouragement’leads children to hold more inclusive beliefs about who can succeed in science and bolsters science efficacy and interest, particularly among children from ethnic minority groups that are underrepresented in science,’ explains Marjorie Rhodes, an associate professor in NYU’s Department of Psychology and the senior author of the study.

Author: NYU Web Communications
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‘Doing Science,’ Rather than ‘Being Scientists,’ More Encouraging to Those Underrepresented in the Field

The results are consistent with those reported earlier this year by Rhodes’ research team. In a February study that appeared in the journal’Psychological Science, the researchers found that asking’young girls’to ‘do science’ leads them to show greater persistence in subsequent science activities than does asking them to ‘be scientists.’ The samples in these previous studies were primarily white, however, and the researchers hypothesized that the benefits of action-focused language would extend more broadly (to children of both genders) in more racially, ethnically, and economically diverse samples.

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Publisher: ScienceBlog.com
Date: 2019-05-13T13:29:24+00:00
Author: Author link
Twitter: @ScienceBlogTwit
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Adjust your language to encourage kids in science

For the new study, researchers studied more than 300 elementary-school children in Brooklyn and the Bronx over the course of the school year. Children in the study were primarily Hispanic, but reflected the racial diversity of their surrounding communities and roughly evenly split between boys and girls.

‘Studying a more diverse population is crucial if we want to understand and ensure efforts to improve science engagement work for everyone,’ says Ryan Lei, a postdoctoral research fellow and lead author of the paper. ‘That we see similar effects across children of different backgrounds in these communities suggests that using action-focused language could be a promising strategy to help a large number of children stay engaged in science.’

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Publisher: Futurity
Date: 2019-05-13T14:59:15+00:00
Twitter: @FuturityNews
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Working scientist podcast: Love science, loathe coding? Research software engineers to the rescue

In the third episode of our six-part podcast series on workplace technology, we learn more about the importance of coding for scientists followed by an introduction to the work of research software engineers.

Simon Hettrick, deputy director of the UK Software Sustainability Institute, tells Julie Gould about the typical career path of a research software engineer, and how their skills can support researchers with limited coding skills.

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Harriet Alexander starts the programme by telling Nature technology editor Jeff Perkel about her role as an instructor for Software Carpentry, a global non-profit organisation which teaches research computing skills to scientists. 'Doing science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more ... science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more encouraging to girls. by New York University Who typically attends a Carpentry course and what do they learn during a workshop?

Date: 2019-04-17
Twitter: @nature
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Women choose more precise words than men when applying for grant funding, but guess who’s more successful?

Women tend to use ‘narrow’ words, compared to men’s ‘broad’ word choices, a new study shows

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Women scientists are less likely to win funding for grants, even when they’re evaluated anonymously, according to a recent working paper distributed by the National Bureau of Economic Research. The apparent driving force: Women’s penchant for using ‘narrow’ words in their grant proposals, versus men’s tendency toward ‘broad’ words.

The researchers, who analyzed 6,794 Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant proposals spanning a decade, also found that the text-based criteria that drove reviewers’ selections didn’t necessarily weed out weaker proposals. 'Doing science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more ... York University. (2019, February 6). 'Doing science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more encouraging to girls. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 17, 2019 from In fact, study co-author Julian Kolev told MarketWatch, ‘Grant awards that were based on broad language actually ended up, fairly often, underperforming the awards proposals that had narrower language.’

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Publisher: MarketWatch
Date: 2019-05-08T06:34:00-04:00
Author: Meera Jagannathan
Twitter: @624413
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