How the science of persuasion could change the politics of climate change

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How the science of persuasion could change the politics of climate change‘MIT Technology ReviewA Climate Science Tutorial Prepared for Hon. William Alsup‘The Heartland Institute

How the science of persuasion could change the politics of climate change

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Jerry Taylor believes he can change the minds of conservative climate skeptics. After all, he helped plant the doubts for many in the first place.

Taylor spent years as a professional climate denier at the Cato Institute, arguing against climate science, regulations, and treaties in op-eds, speeches, and media appearances. But his perspective slowly began to change around the turn of the century, driven by the arguments of several economists and legal scholars laying out the long-tail risks of global warming.

Now he’s president of the Niskanen Center, a libertarian-leaning Washington, DC, think tank he founded in 2014. He and his colleagues there are trying to build support for the passage of an aggressive federal carbon tax, through discussions with Washington insiders, with a particular focus on Republican legislators and their staff.

A small but growing contingent of fiscal conservatives and corporate interests are arguing for similar policies in the United States. They include party elders like former secretary of state George Shultz, energy giants like Exxon Mobil, and nearly two dozen college Republican groups. Taylor and others believe it’s conversations like these’with political elites, and focused on policies they can justify in conservative terms’that could eventually lead to real action on climate change.

  • Publisher: MIT Technology Review
  • Author: James Temple
  • Twitter: @techreview
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March for Science 2018: Passionate advocates push the cause for research across the globe

WASHINGTON ‘ Thousands on the National Mall on Saturday’marched past the Environmental Protection Agency and to the U.S. Capitol’to’advocate for science’to play a larger role in society ‘ and stressed’how research’already ripples through a slew of issues from guns to immigration.

“What do we want? Science. When do we want it? After peer review,” the crowd of science’researchers, medical professionals and social advocates chanted as they donned lab coats and held signs that'”Science Not Silence” on’a summer-like April’day.

Cliff Andrew, 71, a part-time assistant professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins, emphasized’the role of evidence underpinning other political issues beyond science advocacy.

“We live our lives in science, but we don’t always push it politically and that’s extremely important,” Andrew said.

He attended both the March for Our Lives and Women’s March, advocating for gun legislation and women’s issues earlier this year, but said the science march is the most important one.

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  • Publisher: USA TODAY
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Watching: Climate Science Tutorial Prepared, The Heartland Institute How, Jerry Taylor

How the science of persuasion could change the politics of climate change
on 15th of Apr 2018 Jerry Taylor believes he can change the minds of conservative climate skeptics. After all, he helped plant the doubts for many in the first place. Taylor spent years as a professional climate denier at the Cato Institute, arguing against climate science

March for Science 2018: Passionate advocates push the cause for research across the globe
(Apr 2018) Cliff Andrew, 71, a part-time assistant professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins, emphasized the role of evidence underpinning other political issues beyond . Valdez-Ward studies soil science and climate change and thinks about how the world will

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